Quran Focus Academy Blog

What is Eid Al Adha or Eid ul Aza? When will Muslim celebrate Eid Al Adha 2016?

Eid Al Adha is one of the holiest celebrations on the Islamic calendar. The holiday known as the “Feast of Sacrifice” or ”Festival of the Sacrifice”, also called the “Bakr-Eid” represents the end of Hajj, an annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia that lasts three to four days. The Holy Quran recommends all Muslims make the journey at least once in their lifetime.

What is Eid Al Adha?

Muslims celebrate this day as a reminder of the time in which Ibrahim was about to sacrifice his son but was told by God to sacrifice an animal instead. The celebration symbolizes Ibrahim’s devotion to Allah.

When will Eid Al Adha start?

Up to 2 million Muslims from around the world arrived in Saudi Arabia for the start of Hajj this week. The start of Eid Al Adha is determined based on the lunar cycle, which means the festival falls on a different date every year. In 2016, it was expected to fall on Sunday, But the new moon was not spotted on Sept. 1 as expected and instead was spotted on the second day of the month. That means Eid Al Adha will start on Monday and end Tuesday, Metro UK reported.

How is Eid Al Adha celebrated?

Depending on where you are in the world, Eid Al Adha could be celebrated on a different day. For example, the Saudi Arabia’s Supreme Court announced that it would celebrate the festival Monday, whereas other nations will celebrate Tuesday.

Eid al-Adha

Muslims start out the day with a morning prayer and then exchange gifts and food among family and friends. They are required to share their food and money with the poor so they can also take part in the celebrations. Worshippers typically slaughter an animal
like a goat or sheep. Close to 10 million animals are slaughtered in Pakistan on Eid.

For those who make the pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia, they are expected to perform two rituals. The first is a lesser pilgrimage known as “Umrah,” or a journey to Mecca at any time of the year. The second is the main pilgrimage, known as “Hajj.” During
these rituals, worshippers are to circle the Kaaba, believed to be a shrine built by Ibrahim and pray to Allah.

The festival is traditionally four days long, but the celebration of the public holiday varies depending on the country.

Like Eid al-Fitr, Eid al-Adha begins with a sunnah prayer of two rakats followed by a sermon (khutbah). Eid al-Adha celebrations start after the descent of the Hujjaj, the pilgrims performing the Hajj, from Mount Arafat , a hill east of Mecca. Eid sacrifice may take place until sunset on the 13th day of Dhu al-Hijjah.

Hajj 2016: Five-day pilgrimage begins on September 10

The 2016 Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca is a five-day ritual beginning on Saturday, September 10 and ending on the 15th.

Hajj is an annual piligrimage to Mecca for millions of Muslims from all over the world.

In 2016, Hajj, one of the world’s largest gatherings, is to begin on Saturday, September 10.

The dates of the pilgrimage were confirmed by Hajj authorities in Saudi Arabia on September 1 based on the sighting of the Moon.

hajj

Hajj 2016

On the third day of Hajj each year, Muslims celebrate the Eid al-Adha, Islam’s holiest festival.

In the Islamic calendar, Hajj begins on the eighth day of the Dhu al-Hijjah lunar month, and ends on the 13th day of Dhu al-Hijjah. The religious rituals of the Hajj pilgrimage, however, can be completed in five days.

For Muslims, the Hajj re-enacts the actions of the Prophet Muhammad in his “farewell pilgrimage” in AD632, and is a central pillar of the Islamic faith meant to cleanse the faithful of sin and bring them closer to God.

Students from Lowfield Primary School visit Sheffield Islamic Centre Madina Masjid Trust

Students from Lowfield Primary School visited a local Mosque, to learn more about Muslims living in the city.

The youngsters visited Sheffield Islamic Centre Madina Masjid Trust, where they were given a tour of the Mosque’s wash rooms, prayer areas and library and learned more about the contents of the Quran and how children start to study the religious text of Islam from a young age.

Mosque visit - Quran Focus Academy

The children and staff were joined by students from their partner school, Hartington C of E Primary School, as part of studies into city and countryside cultures and differences.

Lowfield Teaching Assistant, Judith Flower, said: “The Mosque tour was such a great experience, for both the children and the staff. We removed our shoes and our guide explained the importance and relevance of why Muslim people cleanse before they go to pray.

“We learnt so much about the religious views of Muslim people, as well as how and where they pray.

“It was fantastic to see all the children asking questions to develop their learning. As Hartington is a Church School with a strong Christian ethos, it is fantastic that pupils are able to learn about other great world faiths.”

This event came after Sheffield youngsters visited the Derbyshire Dales school in July last year, where they investigated life within a rural community.

Hartington pupil Jacob Blackwell, 9, said: “It was interesting to see the Mosque and stunning to learn more about what Muslim people do when they pray and how they worship Allah.”

Lowfield School Council Co-ordinator and Year 3 Teacher, Richard Green said: “The trip to the Mosque gave the Hartington children an understanding of the social and cultural activities that our children undertake and really bonded the two communities.”

Teaching the Holy Quran in Uyghur, China

Mosques fail to offer enough space for worshippers at regular Friday prayers for Muslims in two prominent cities of the Uyghur Autonomous Region of China: Urumchi and Kashgar. People have to take to the streets and squares without bothering others. The Idkha Mosque in downtown Kashgar is the largest mosque in the region. More than 30,000 people join the Eid prayers performed in the square that also hosts the mosque. The Idkha Mosque was built in 1442 and was enlarged three times. Around 700 people can perform prayers in the closed area of the mosque.

There are 28,000 clerics (24,000 appointed to mosques) officially assigned to the Uyghur Autonomous Region. There are schools teaching lessons on the Quran in the local towns that offer courses lasting two to three months. Graduates of elementary and high schools are admitted to these schools. China has nine years of compulsory education during which no religious courses are offered. There are 10 Quran courses in China. The Xinjiang Quran School is the only officially recognized school for teaching the Quran in Xinjiang Uyghur region in China. It is also the only school that teaches the Quran in the Uyghur language in China. The hadiths are recited in Arabic but the explanations are in Uyghur. Students study for five years in the school to receive their qualifications and Muslim graduates who are appointed to serve the people are given a monthly allowance. There are 10 different ethnic Muslim groups in Xinjiang and those other than the Kazakhs, Kyrgyz and Huis are able to communicate with each other. The graduates of the school teach the Quran to the public and some work as members of the local popular congress. The Chinese Religious Affairs Directorate and the Chinese Islamic Affairs Department regulate the appointment of students abroad. Of these, 37 students continued their education in Egypt. The Huis have nine other Quran schools in other parts of China. The Huis teach in the Chinese language.

The construction of the Xinjiang Quran School started in 1983 and the school was completed in 1987. It receives financial aid from the state and the Chinese government gave 250 million yuan in 2012 to construct a huge new school that now hosts 300 students and 70 teachers. They train clerics in eight undergraduate and three pre-undergraduate programs. Mainly religious and cultural courses are offered, with cultural courses constituting 3 percent of the curriculum. The cultural classes include ethnic and religious policies. Uyghur literature, Arab language and literature, and history are also being taught. Seventy percent of the courses are focused on religious studies, which include studying the Quran, recital, tawjeed (rules of recitation), methodology, Islamic jurisprudence, Islamic theology and culture, the life of the Prophet Muhammad and Arabic grammar. Male high school graduates aged between 18 and 22 are admitted to the school in a two-stage exam.

The Xinjiang Quran School is a religious school that trains clerics. They do not admit female students. There are three different types of religious education: clerical school, Quran courses and Quran schools. Women are allowed to receive religious training from their fathers or husbands at home.

The school offers help every year for those who would like to perform the pilgrimage in Mecca. The pilgrims have to meet several conditions, including having sufficient financial resources, being healthy and able to travel. Every year, nearly 14,000 people in China travel to Mecca for the pilgrimage. Of these, about 3,500 sign up for the pilgrimage in Xinjiang. Turkish Religious Affairs Directorate President Mehmet Görmez has paid a visit to Xinjiang twice. He was appointed president after he returned from Urumchi. For this reason, it is argued that Urumchi brings good luck.

Hasan KANBOLAT   h.kanbolat@todayszaman.com

Previously Published in Todays Zaman

 

Salah Names, Rakat and Time or Namaz Names and Rakaat

Name Rakat Time
Fajr 04
02 Sunnah | 02 Farz
From dawn before sunrise.
Zuhar 12
04 Sunah | 04 Farz
02 Sunnah | 02 Nawafil
Between the declining of sun & Asr.
Asr 08
04 Sunnah | 04 Farz
(Late afternoon) Immediately after the last time limit    of Zuhar until just before the sunset.
Maghrib 07
03 Farz | 02 Sunnah
02 Nawafil
(Evening) Soon after sunset until the disappearance of the twilight.
Isha 17
04 Sunnah | 04 Farz
02 Sunnah | 02 Nawafil
03 Witar | 02 Nawafil
After the disappearance of the twilight until midnight.
Juma 14
04 Sunnah | 02 Farz
04 Sunnah| 02 Sunnah
02 Nawafil
Between the declining of sun & Asr. Juma can’t be offered individually. If you happen to miss Juma prayer, then you should offer Zuhar.

 

 

How to perform Eid-ul-Adha Prayer (Step by Step)

Eid prayer consists of two units (Rakat in Arabic, singular is Raka). The main difference in the way this prayer and any other prayer of two Rakat is performed is the number of Takbirs that are done.

Takbirs is an Arabic word referring to when “Allahu Akbar” is said and the hands are raised to the ears.

Step 1: Make an intention of doing two Rakat behind the Imam for Eid prayer along with six additional Takbirs.

The First Raka

Step 2: After the Imam has said “Allahu Akbar” the first time, you should raise your hands and follow. This is the first Takbir of the prayer.

Step 3: There will be 3 Takbirs before the Imam starts reciting Quran. Each time the Imam says “Allahu Akbar”, you should follow by raising your hands, then putting them on your sides.

After the third Takbir, the Imam will begin reciting the Quran. At that point, you should put your hands on your chest, with your right hand on top of the left.

Step 4: Listen to the recitation of the Holy Quran. The Imam will recite Surah Al Fatiha (the first Surah of the Quran) and then another Surah.

Step 5: When the Imam says “Allahu Akbar” go into Ruku (the bowing position).

Step 6: Stand up straight when he says Sami Allahu liman Hamidah (Allah hears those who praise Him), and say “Rabbana lakal Hamd” (our Lord praise be to You) in a low voice.

Step 7: When the Imam says “Allahu Akbar” go into Sujud (prostration). You will do two prostrations as in normal prayer.

The Second Raka

Step 8: The Imam will first recite from the Holy Quran (first Surah Al Fatiha and another Surah.

Step 9: After the recitation, before going into Ruku, there will be 3 Takbirs. Follow the Imam. Raise your hands after each “Allahu Akbar”. After the third Takbir, go into Ruku (the bowing position).

Step 10: Stand up straight when the Imam says Sami Allah huliman Hamidah, and say “Rabbana lakal Hamd” in a low voice.

Step 11: When the Imam says “Allahu Akbar” go into Sujud. You will do two prostrations.

Step 12: After this, you sit for the complete Tashshahud.

Step 13: After the Imam ends the prayer by turning to his face to the right first and saying “Assalamu alaikum wa Rahmatullah” and then to his left and doing the same, you should follow.

Step 14: Do not get up right away. The Imam will give a short Khutbah (speech). Please stay still and listen. It is recommended to do so.

 

 

Eid Ul-Adha or Eid Ul Azha

Although only the pilgrims in Makkah can participate in the Hajj fully, all the other Muslims in the world join with them by celebrating the Eid ul Adha [eed ul ud-ha], or Festival of Sacrifice. On the 10th of Dhul-Hijjah, Muslims around the world wear their nicest clothing and attend a special prayer gathering in the morning. This is followed by a short sermon, after which everyone stands up to hug and greet one another. The traditional Eid greeting is “Eid Mubarak,” which means “Holiday Blessings.”

Next, people visit each other’s homes and partake in festive meals with special dishes, beverages, and desserts. Children receive gifts and sweets on this joyous occasion.

 

In addition, like the pilgrims in Makkah, those Muslims who can afford to do so offer domestic animals, usually sheep, as a symbol of Prophet Ibraheem’s sacrifice. The meat is distributed for consumption to family, friends, and to the poor and needy.

The Eid ul-Adha is a major religious event in the lives of Muslims.

The Prophet Muhammad’s (PBUH) Last Sermon or Khutba

This sermon was delivered on the Ninth Day of Dhul Hijjah 10 A.H.
in the ‘Uranah valley of Mount Arafat’ (in Mecca).

After praising, and thanking Allah he said:

“O People, lend me an attentive ear, for I know not whether after this year, I shall ever be amongst you again. Therefore listen to what I am saying to you very carefully and TAKE THESE WORDS TO THOSE WHO COULD NOT BE PRESENT HERE TODAY.

 

O People, just as you regard this month, this day, this city as Sacred, so regard the life and property of every Muslim as a sacred trust. Return the goods entrusted to you to their rightful owners. Hurt no one so that no one may hurt you. Remember that you will indeed meet your LORD, and that HE will indeed reckon your deeds. ALLAH has forbidden you to take usury (interest), therefore all interest obligation shall henceforth be waived. Your capital, however, is yours to keep. You will neither inflict nor suffer any inequity. Allah has Judged that there shall be no interest and that all the interest due to Abbas ibn ‘Abd’al Muttalib (Prophet’s uncle) shall henceforth be waived…

Beware of Satan, for the safety of your religion. He has lost all hope that he will ever be able to lead you astray in big things, so beware of following him in small things.

O People, it is true that you have certain rights with regard to your women, but they also have rights over you. Remember that you have taken them as your wives only under Allah’s trust and with His permission. If they abide by your right then to them belongs the right to be fed and clothed in kindness. Do treat your women well and be kind to them for they are your partners and committed helpers. And it is your right that they do not make friends with any one of whom you do not approve, as well as never to be unchaste.

O People, listen to me in earnest, worship ALLAH, say your five daily prayers (Salah), fast during the month of Ramadan, and give your wealth in Zakat. Perform Hajj if you can afford to.

All mankind is from Adam and Eve, an Arab has no superiority over a non-Arab nor a non-Arab has any superiority over an Arab; also a white has no superiority over black nor a black has any superiority over white except by piety and good action. Learn that every Muslim is a brother to every Muslim and that the Muslims constitute one brotherhood. Nothing shall be legitimate to a Muslim which belongs to a fellow Muslim unless it was given freely and willingly. Do not, therefore, do injustice to yourselves.

Remember, one day you will appear before ALLAH and answer your deeds. So beware, do not stray from the path of righteousness after I am gone.

O People, NO PROPHET OR APOSTLE WILL COME AFTER ME AND NO NEW FAITH WILL BE BORN. Reason well, therefore, O People, and understand words which I convey to you. I leave behind me two things, the QURAN and my example, the SUNNAH and if you follow these you will never go astray.

All those who listen to me shall pass on my words to others and those to others again; and may the last ones understand my words better than those who listen to me directly. Be my witness, O ALLAH, that I have conveyed your message to your people”.

The Hajj (Pilgrimage to Mecca)

The Hajj (Pilgrimage to Mecca)

THE HAJJ, or pilgrimage, is the fifth of the five pillars (duties) of Islam. Every able-bodied Muslim should make the pilgrimage at least once in his or her lifetime, finances permitting.

 

The Hajj takes place annually during the first 10 days of the Dhu al-Hijja, the twelfth month of the Islamic year. The Islamic calendar is based on lunar months, so the actual date moves forward about 11 days each year in relation to the western solar calendar.

 

During the Hajj, pilgrims must be in a state of ihram (consecration). Men wear two pieces of white unstitched cloth – covering the waist and legs, the other around the shoulders covering the upper body. While in ihram, pilgrims must not cut hair or nails, wear perfumes, kill animals or insects, or engage in any kind of sexual relations (including proposals of marriage).

 

Islamic Calendar or Hijri Calendar

The Islamic Calendar has 12 months and 354 days. This is because the Islamic Calendar (or Hijri Calendar) follows the movements of Earth’s Moon. Arabic names of Islamic Months  with English Transliteration are given below. Muslim kids and students should learn and memorize the names of all the Islamic months in their order.

Hijri Calender

Hijri Calender